By Miki Miyatake Nishizawa

on Hiroshi Kariya’s “Empty”exhibition at Mizuma Art Gallery, Tokyo

The Japan Times/ Saturday, May 11, 1996/ page 15

   “The now is the now is the now is the now is the...”
Hiroshi Kariya continues to write this phrase daily.
Handwritten with a calligraphy brush, it looks like a Buddhist sutra.

   In Buddhist thought, the idea of “the now” signifies that living beings should live each single moment of “now”. A string of “now and now and now...” constitutes the whole history of the universe.

   Kariya writes “the now is sutra” on both sides of a dried bean seed, going through about 100 beans every night before going to bed. He keeps the finished beans in plastic bags with notes of his daily thoughts. For him, it is similar to meditation, a practice of being present in the now.
   For Kariya, creating art is not separate from his dailychores. Taking each breath could be an exercise of art, and living itself is art.

   Three days before the opening day of his current exhibition at Mizuma Art Gallery in Aoyama, Tokyo, he started writing in chalk “the now is the now is the...” in spiral from the center of the concrete floor. The periphery of the circle is lined with pieces of limestone from Michigan bearing the words “the now is...” written in a spiral of tiny letters.
   The writing, which starts from the center of one side of a stone, makes its way clockwise, coiling to the other side of the stone. The beginning and the end of the writing are connected by Kariya piercing a hole in the middle of the stone. The idea that “there is no beginning and no end” signifies eternity, while at the same time it has a limit as one object.
   Going clockwise follows Buddhist custom-a pilgrimage circuit of Buddhist temples in one area is supposed to be done clockwise. The loop without the end seems to be symbolic of reincarnation and the universe where everything is rotating in transformational stages repeating life and death.
 
   “The now is sutra” is engraved on a thick candle placed at the north point of the circle of the text on the floor as well as on glass bowl containing water placed at the south end.
Fire melts the candle and water evaporates from the bowl, and “this transformation fuses with the space at present,” says Kariya. The whole piece visually presents the universe in miniature with an incantation-like spiral text in the middle.
   Kariya’s practice of writing on dried beans in January and February 1992 is recorded in two booklets entitled “One day one piece one grasp seed sutra.” On each page, a fourline stanza written by Kariya is printed with the number of beans he scribbled that day along with date and place.

 

   Based in Brooklyn, N.Y., his poem was first in English:

  One piece of Brahma Day
  One Piece of ‘the now is’
  One Piece of 8,640,000,000 years
  One Grasp of 104 pieces

  (January 18, 1992, Studio, N.Y.)


   His interest and concern expressed in his poems shifted from the conflicts in various parts of the world to a more personal one as he traveled to his hometown to see his mother, ill with cancer.

   The poems he wrote during his stay in Japan frequently contain kanji characters meaning “pain, mother, me, breathe, dream, explain, morning, afraid.”
   Kariya’s love for his mother and his suffering over her pain permeate the poems. His writing the seed sutra every night for her recovery and also a means to soothe his feelings.
   What Kariya does looks simple, but the visual and spiritual impact of his writings are striking. The magical power of incantation is present, and his ritualistic manner of creation is convincing.
Barefoot, with his hair tied in a pony tail and writing “the now is sutra” on the floor, Kariya may remind us of a lordless samurai living with a Zen priest’s peaceful state of mind. He appears undisturbed by the overwhelming pace of the outer world.
   It is interesting to see Kariya’s Japanese identity, his gracious attitude and power preserved even after living in New York for close to 20 years. He is very much in touch with himself, and it is obvious that his art work comes from the core of his being. As long as he lives, he will use his hands and mark the path of his life.

 


  By Miki Miyatake on Hiroshi Kariya’s “Empty”
  exhibition at Mizuma Art Gallery (J), Tokyo

  The Japan Times/ Saturday, May 11, 1996/ page 15


©1996-2021 Hiroshi Kariya & Miki Miyatake Nishizawa

2000s    2020    ARCHETYPE

             2018    O.KOPYRUSHA

1990s     1998    OMATA IZUMI

             1998    ERIC MEZIL

             1996    M.MIYATAKE

             1995    A.M.WEAVER

             1994    Y.KURABAYASHI

             1994    S.WATANABE

             1990    W.SOZANSKI

1980s     1979    OTHERS

 
この在・いま現在という種子を蒔く

東京・ミヅマアートギャラリーでの刈谷博「空」展について
宮武三紀/ジャパンタイムズ/1996年5月11日土曜日/15ページ


「The now is the now is the now is the now is ......」

 注) 刈谷は日本語では、いま、を「在」と提示し、全て同時に持続し循環しつづける一つを指します。

「The now is the now is the now is the now is......」」
 刈谷博はこのフレーズを毎日書き続けています。それは書道の筆で手書きされた仏典のようです。
 
 仏教思想で、「いま」という考えには、生きものが「いま」一瞬一瞬を生きつづけていることを意味します。 「いま、いま、そしていま...」という文字列は、宇宙の歴史の全てを集約します。

 刈谷は、乾いた豆種子の両面に「The now is 経」を記述し、毎晩、作家の一握り分の、その数およそ100粒の豆への記述を経て就寝します。彼は完成した豆種子をビニール袋に入れ、日々の印象をメモします。彼にとって、それは終わることのない瞑想に存在しつづけるような行為です。刈谷にとって、アートを作るとは彼の日常茶飯事と切り離されるものではなく。息を吸うことも芸術の習いとなり、生きること自体が芸術と化すのです。

 東京・青山のミヅマアートギャラリーでの現在の展覧会の初日の3日前から、彼はコンクリートの床の中央から「The now is...」とチョークで螺旋状に書き始めます。記述の円周の外円には、ミシガン州の石灰石の円が並び取り囲みます。それぞれの石の周りは小さな文字の渦巻きが「The now is...」という言葉の連続が同じように記述されています。石の片側の中心から始まる書き込みは、時計回りに進み、石の反対側に巻かれ終わります。執筆の始まりと終わりは、刈谷が真ん中に穴を開けることによって数珠のイメージに接続するのです。


 数珠の石。「始まりも終わりもない」という作品は永遠を直感させ、同時に一つの対象:物としての限界をも示すのです。時計回りにと云うことは仏教の習慣に従っているのでしょうかーある地域の仏教寺院の巡礼回路は時計回りに行われるとか。

 終わりのない円環は、生まれ変わりのすべてが同時存在する宇宙の象徴のようです。ーそれは生と死を繰り返す変革の段階で回転しています。

 「The now is 経」は、床上チョークの記述円の北位に配置された厚目のろうそくと、南位に配置された水が入ったガラス容器にも刻まれています。
火はろうそくを溶かし、容器の水は蒸発し、「これらの変化は同時に現在の空間と融合します」と刈谷は言います。作品全体が、真ん中に呪文のようなスパイラルテキストを備えたミニチュア宇宙を視覚的に表現しているのです。


 1992年1、2月分の刈谷の種子作品に付随した文章は「一日一句一握種子経」と題された2冊の小冊子に記録されています。各ページには、刈谷の記述による四行詩が続き番号で印刷されています。彼はその一日毎に種子経への走り書きを日付と場所に添付します。


 ニューヨーク、ブルックリンを拠点とする彼の詩は、英語で始まります。
------------------------------------------
 一粒のブラウマの日々
 一粒の「The now is」
 一粒の86億4000万年
 一握の104粒


 (1992年1月18日、スタジオ、ニューヨーク)
------------------------------------------
 彼の詩に表現された自身が集中する関心ごとは、癌に患っている母親に会う目的で故郷に旅行したときには、世界のさまざまな地域での紛争の情報などより身近な個人的なものに移行します。

 彼が日本滞在中に書いた詩には、「痛み、母、私、呼吸、夢、説明、朝、恐れ」を意味する漢字がよく含まれています。刈谷の母親への愛と彼女の痛みに対する彼の苦しみが詩に浸透します。彼は母の回復祈願と自身の気持ちを和らげる手段も含め毎晩種子経を書きつづけます。刈谷の仕事はシンプルに見えますが、彼の著作の視覚的および精神的な影響は印象的です。呪文の魔法の力が存在を果たし、儀式的な創造方法が説得力を持って迫ってくるのです。


 素足で、髪をポニーテールに結び、床に「The now is 経」を書っている刈谷は禅僧の安らかな心の状態で生きる主なき武士を彷彿させるかもしれません。外界の如何なる圧倒的な流れの渦にも侵されることがないかのように。

 ニューヨークに20年近く住んだ後も、刈谷の日本人のアイデンティティ、優雅な態度、威厳深さを見るのは興味深いことです。彼は彼の内なる自身とつながっていて彼の芸術作品がそこから発していることは明らかです。彼の存在の核心とは何なのであるか。彼が生きている限り、彼は自らの手によって自らとは、人とは、生とは、の道を示しつづけることでしょう。

 


刈谷博の「空」展覧会について宮武三紀
東京・ミヅマアートギャラリー

ジャパンタイムズ/ 1996年5月11日土曜日/ 15頁

 注) 刈谷は日本語で、いま、を「在」と表記し、全て同時に持続し循環しつづける一つの生を示します。

©1996-2021刈谷博&宮武三紀

25.gif

2000s    2020    ARCHETYPE

             2018    O.KOPYRUSHA

1990s     1998    OMATA IZUMI

             1998    ERIC MEZIL

             1996    M.MIYATAKE

             1995    A.M.WEAVER

             1994    Y.KURABAYASHI

             1994    S.WATANABE

             1990    W.SOZANSKI

1980s     1979    OTHERS