Contemplating, Creation, Rebirth

Sozanski/1990/eng

By Edward J. Sozanski
Article/ The Philadelphia Inquirer, newspaper, 3.18, 1990

 The task that Hiroshi Kariya has set for himself is daunting- to express through art the unity of all people, places and things in the universe throughout the eons that the universe has existed.
 He has confronted this task for 13 years with the compulsive steadfastness of an Eastern mystic. Kariya’s art is not concerned with object-making. It attempts to stimulate in the observer a higher consciousness akin to a state of grace, and if you sit with his work for a while, you begin to sense that this is far from an outstanding objective.

 To recognize that objective, one needs at least a vague understanding of the philosophy of Kariya, who was born in Japan but who has lived in the United States since 1977. The best introduction to it is the wall text he has composed for his tripartite installation at the Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania, as part of the ICA’s ongoing “Investigations” series.

 The installation, which will continue through April 25, is called Sutra: One Thing in Everything, Everything in One Thing. The text, hand-printed on the wall in ink, introduces the section that occupies the upper gallery. It reads as follows:
......................................................................

 

 ABANDONED, BURIED, BURNT, AND/OR LOST
In addition to the work being shown, there exists, somewhere in this universe, the work that I abandoned, buried, burned, and/or lost, which is not visible here.

 In Japan, Sutra writing is occasionally performed as a mass for the dead, a prayer for the recovery of sickly person, or as a prayer for a wish to be granted.

 The writers sacrifice their spirit and time for the sake of fulfilling their true wish. They commit themselves to spending a certain period of time while making an endeavor toward a certain amount of work.

 Sometimes a sutra is made by means other than writing.
It may take the form of a silent prayer or action that is consciously repeated to obtain what is being focused upon.

 Some works are buried underground- for that which is nature’s return to nature, the universal system. Another reason is a message for the future. It is their undeniable knowledge to resurface and be recalled.

 Once every year, usually at the beginning of the year, some of these writings are gathered and burned to ashes of holiness. Thus, they receive a new beginning, a new life, and are reborn. They celebrate the incessant resurrection of nature.

  Hiroshi Kariya 1990

......................................................................


 The key concepts in this passage are sutra and rebirth, the foundation of all three parts of Kariya’s installation.

In Indian philosophy, a Sutra (from the Sanskrit word for thread) is a compilation of rules or principles that governs a particular aspect of life, For example, Kama sutra, the one most familiar to Westerners, codifies the conventions of physical love. Kariya adapts the concept as a group of words that conveys a fundamental idea about the world in a way that transcends time and place.
 The sutra underlying Kariya’s work, which he has written on various objects thousands of times since 1977, is “is the now”. To him, this inelegant phrase represents the immediacy of creation, and for him the act of creating is more important than the thing created.

 Kariya also believes that the material world is a continuum, that nothing is ever irrevocably destroyed, that the present can speak to the future just as the past speaks to the present, and that nature should be respected. Rebirth, which the installation expresses more prosaically as recycling, is a concept to be honored and encouraged.
 For Kariya, the installation represents a prolonged act of meditation on immortality. It is a contemplative work constructed with humble materials such as rocks, beans and driftwood, which have been energized through repetitive sutra inscriptions in ink and paint.
 The easiest part of the installation for an observer to grasp is Memory Wall, which occupies the west wall of the lower gallery. Memory Wall expresses the idea of rebirth literally; It’s constructed of the framing lumber and sheetrock that were used for the previous installation in the gallery, by Russian artist Ilya Kabakov.
 Kabakov’s installation consisted of a sheetrock wall that covered the south end of the lower gallery and a free-standing U-shaped wall in the center of the room. Kariya demolished these walls, but before he did, he sectioned them with chalklines into grids and marked with an identifying letter and number, much as archaeologists mark out a dig site.
 Kariya then assembled some of the larger chunks of the demolished Kabakov walls into a new, irregular wall. The leftover framing lumber is neatly stacked at the side, each piece numbered, and the debris, including even the dust from the demolition, is heaped behind it.
 Simple as it is, Memory Wall embodies the idea of reincarnation with surprising eloquence. Its post-Kabakov codings testify to its former existence, and its deliberately ragged appearance reminds the observer that it honors the spirit of reincarnation more than material perfection.
 Andy Wahol’s  memory  wooden fragment #26
(This fragment was revealed after demolition, used for Andy Wahol’s first Museum solo exhibition)

But it does have a practical aspect. Kariya has stamped and numbered 800 small pieces of sheetrock that the ICA will sell for a dollar each, with the proceeds to be used to recoup the cost of the Kbakov walls.

 On the opposite wall of the lower gallery, Kariya has installed a work-in-progress called 8000 Years Spring, 8000 Years Autumn.  Forty-eight feet long by 8 feet high, it is made of pieces of used wood, each 2 feet long.
 The pieces are stacked on the wall in six rows. The stacks vary in height, and most of the wood is tinted green (for spring) or red and purple (for autumn). Most also are marked with a simulated script that represents Kariya’s “is the now” sutra.
 The sutra writing also covers a series of large scrolls open to various lengths on the floor in front of the wall.
The visual effect of the wall array is something like an abstract codex or calendar.  One recognizes it as a record of time passed, but it also alludes to the rhythmic cadence of language. Because sutra writing is abstract-it vaguely resembles Arabic or Persian-it communicates metaphorically, but its incantatory purpose is clear.

...The most ritualistic aspect of the total installation, Sutra Tomb, occupies the upper gallery. Here, Kariya displays a panoply of sutra objects-wooden discs (on which his sutra is written continuously in a spiral), pieces of driftwood, rocks, small jars of paint, and miscellaneous objects such as candles, seashells, postcards, bones and small paper scrolls.
 Some of these items are organized systematically on a sturdy, wooden free-standing shelf, while others are laid out on the floor behind it. The observer isn’t allowed to walk around or through the piece, so he or she experiences it as a succession of fragmented views.

 To the left, a 20-foot-wide ring of 100 limestone fragments, each covered with sutra writing, circles through an adjacent gallery and links up with the central array; to the right, a ring of 100 piles of white beans, totaling about 100, a “grasp”
The arrangement does approximate an ancient burial chamber, where offerings are left to propitiate gods, but through the seeds it also implies dormancy and rebirth. Like 8000 Years, through, it cannot be deciphered by an outsider, nor do I think the artist intends that anyone should need to do so.
 Literal translation isn’t necessary; the spirit of the work is palpable from its form and constituent elements. If one were to come upon a similar display deep in a primeval forest or in a secluded mountain cave, as an artifact of a vanished civilization, one would understand its purpose intuitively.
 The most distinctive quality of Kariya’s work, aside from the patience and dedication it obviously demands, is that the process of making it-the “sacrifice” to which he refers in his wall text-is more consequential than the artifacts it produces. It is, in fact, its essence.


 By coming upon this installation after the artist has completed his labor (or at least interrupted it), the observer unfortunately misses the main event, which is the artist focusing intently on his task. This art isn’t intended as interpersonal communication; it describes a solitary, almost penitential search for communion with a cosmic unity.
 One judges the quality of such a quest much as one would evaluate a religious mission, by the artist’s persistence and dedication to his ideals. By this standard, Kariya has achieved the most meaningful goal to which art can aspire.

Edward J. Sozanski, Philadelphia Inquirer, 3.18, 1990

 

Contemplating, Creation, Rebirth
Sozanski/1990/eng


瞑想、創造、再生


エドワード・J・ソザンスキー
掲載
記事/フィラデルフィアインクワイアラー3.18、1990

 刈谷博が自ら設定した課題は、宇宙が存在している時代を通じて、宇宙のすべて、人間、場所、物性とは一体であるということをアートで表現することです。


 彼はこの課題に13年間(43年間、2020年現在)、東洋の神秘家の強靭的な不動心に立ち向かったのです。刈谷の芸術は物作りとは関係ありません。それは観察者に恵みの状態に似たより高い意識を刺激するのです、そしてあなたが彼の仕事としばらく座っているならば、あなたはこれが目立とうとする目的からほど遠いことを感じ始めます。

 その目的を認識するためには、日本で生まれ、1977年からアメリカに住んでいる刈谷の哲学を少なくとも漠然と理解する必要があります。それを最もよく紹介しているのは、彼が三部構成の展示のために作成したウォールテキストに紹介されます。展示はペンシルベニア大学の現代美術館の企画、現在進行形のICA「調査」シリーズの一環です。

 4月25日まで継続するインスタレーションは「Sutra:One Thing in Everything、Everything inOneThing」と呼ばれています。壁にインクで手書きされたテキストは、上部のギャラリーを占めるセクションで紹介されています。それは次のように読みます:


「壁面記述」
.................................................
 放棄、埋没、焼失、および/または紛失と表示されている作品に加えて、この宇宙のどこかに、私が放棄、埋葬、焼却、および/または失った作品が存在します、「それらはここには表示されていない」と記述表示されます。

 日本では、一般的に、お経とは、死者のためのミサ、病人の回復のための祈り、または願いが叶うための祈りとして行われることがあります。

 行者たちは真の願いを叶えるために精神と時間を犠牲にします。彼らは、一定の仕事量に向けて精進しながら、一定の期間を費やすことを契約いたします。

 時おり、お経は書く以外の手段で施行されます。
それは、曼:全てを焦点のもとに集合し、荼羅:ものとして所有する意識波動に繰り返す静謐な祈りや行の形をとることがあります。(曼荼羅と呼びます)

 いくつかの作品は地下に埋められます-それは自然の自然への回帰、つまり普遍的なシステムへの還元です。もう一つの理由は、未来へのメッセージです。再浮上し想起される彼らの否定できない知識の為です。

 毎年一回、通常は年の初めに、これらの記述のいくつかが集められ、聖なる灰に生るよう焼かれます。このように、彼ら私たちは新しい始まり、新しい人生を受け取り、生まれ変わります。彼ら私たちは絶え間ない自然の復活を祝います。

 刈谷博1990

.................................................

 このパッセージの重要な概念は、経典と再生であり、刈谷のインスタレーションの3つの部分すべての基礎となっています。

インド哲学では、経典(サンスクリット語でスレッドを意味する)は、人生の特定の側面を支配する規則または原則をまとめたものです。たとえば、西洋人に最もよく知られているカーマスートラは、肉体的な愛の慣習を成文化しています。刈谷は、時間と場所を超えた方法で世界についての基本的な考えを伝える言葉のグループとして概念を適応させます。

1977年以来、さまざまなオブジェに何千回も書いてきた刈谷の作品の根底にある経典は「今」です。彼にとって、このエレガントでないフレーズは創造の即時性を表しており、彼にとって創造する行為は創造されたものよりも重要です。

刈谷はまた、物質界は連続体であり、取り返しのつかないほど破壊されるものはなく、過去が現在に語るのと同じように現在が未来に語りかけることができ、自然が尊重されるべきであると信じています。インスタレーションがリサイクルとしてより乱暴に表現する再生は、尊敬され、奨励されるべき概念です。
刈谷にとって、インスタレーションは不死についての瞑想の長期にわたる行為を表しています。石、豆種子、流木などの謙虚な素材で構成された瞑想的な作品であり、インクと絵の具で繰り返される経典によって活気づけられています。

 

 

「記憶の壁」


 オブザーバーが把握するためのインスタレーションの最も簡単な部分は、下のギャラリーの西の壁を占める記憶の壁です。記憶の壁は、文字通り再生のアイデアを表現しています。これは、ロシアのアーティスト、イリヤ&エミリア・カバコフがギャラリーで以前に設置したときに使用したフレーミング材と石膏ボードで構成されています。

カバコフのインスタレーションは、階下ギャラリーの南端を覆う石膏ボードの壁と、部屋の中央にある自立型のU字型の壁で構成されていました。刈谷はこれらの壁を取り壊しましたが、彼が行う前に、考古学者が発掘現場をマークするのと同じように、彼はそれらをチョークラインでグリッドに分割し、識別文字と番号でマークしました。

その後、刈谷は取り壊されたカバコフの壁の大きな塊のいくつかを新しい不規則な壁に組み立てました。残った骨組み材は側面にきちんと積み上げられ、各ピースに番号が付けられ、解体からのほこりも含めた破片がその後ろに山積みされています。

シンプルでありながら、「記憶の壁」は驚くべき雄弁さで生まれ変わりのアイデアを体現しています。そのカバコフ後のコーディングは、その以前の存在を証明しており、その意図的に不規則な外観は、物質的な完全性よりも生まれ変わりの精神を尊重していることを観察者に思い出させます。

アンディウォーホルの記憶の木片#26(この断片は解体後に明らかになり、アンディウォーホルの最初の美術館の個展に使用されました)が、実用的な側面があります。刈谷は、ICAが1ドルで販売する800個の小さな石膏ボードにスタンプを押して番号を付け、その収益をクバコフの壁の費用を回収するために使用します。

 

「8000年春、8000年秋」

 階下のギャラリーの反対側の壁に、刈谷は8000年春、8000年秋と呼ばれる進行中の作業を設置しました。長さ48フィート、高さ8フィートで、それぞれ長さ2フィートの使用済みの木片でできています。ピースは壁に6列に積み重ねられています。スタックの高さはさまざまで、ほとんどの木材は緑(春の場合)または赤と紫(秋)に着色されています。ほとんどはまた、刈谷の「今」の経典を表すシミュレートされたスクリプトでマークされています。経典はまた、壁の前の床にさまざまな長さで開いている一連の大きな巻物をカバーしています。壁の配列の視覚効果は、抽象的なコーデックスやカレンダーのようなものです。人はそれを経過した時間の記録として認識しますが、それはまた言語のリズミカルなリズムをほのめかします。経典は抽象的であるため(アラビア語やペルシア語に漠然と似ています)、比喩的に伝達しますが、その本質的な目的は明らかです。
 

 

「経墓」


 ...全体のインスタレーションの中で最も儀式的な側面である経典は、上部のギャラリーを占めています。ここでは、刈谷は、木製の円盤(彼の経典がらせん状に連続的に書かれている)、流木、岩、小さな瓶の絵の具、キャンドル、貝殻、はがき、骨、小さなものなどの雑多なオブジェクトのパノラマを表示します紙の巻物。これらのアイテムのいくつかは、頑丈な木製の自立型棚に体系的に整理されていますが、他のアイテムはその後ろの床に配置されています。オブザーバーは作品の中を歩き回ったり、通り抜けたりすることは許可されていないため、断片化された一連のビューとしてそれを体験します。

左側には、幅20フィートの100個の石灰岩の破片の輪があり、それぞれが経典で覆われており、隣接するギャラリーを一周し、中央の配列とつながっています。右側には、白インゲンマメの100の山の輪、合計約100の「握り」があります。この配置は、神をなだめるための供物が残されている古代の埋葬室に似ていますが、種子を通して休眠と再生も意味します。 8000年のように、それは部外者によって解読されることはできませんし、アーティストは誰もがそうする必要があると意図しているとは思いません。直訳は必要ありません。作品の精神は、その形と構成要素から明白です。原生林の奥深くや人里離れた山の洞窟で、消えた文明の遺物として同様の展示に出くわすと、その目的を直感的に理解できるでしょう。明らかに要求される忍耐と献身を除けば、刈谷の作品の最も特徴的な品質は、それを作るプロセス、つまり彼が壁のテキストで言及している「犠牲」が、それが生み出すアーティファクトよりも重要であるということです。実際、それはその本質です。

アーティストが彼の労働を完了した(または少なくともそれを中断した)後にこのインスタレーションに出くわすことによって、オブザーバーは残念ながらメインイベントを見逃します。それはアーティストが彼の仕事に熱心に集中していることです。この芸術は対人コミュニケーションを目的としたものではありません。それは、宇宙の統一との交わりのための孤独な、ほとんど悔い改めの探求を説明しています。芸術家の粘り強さと彼の理想への献身によって、宗教的使命を評価するのと同じように、そのような探求の質を判断します。この基準により、刈谷は芸術が目指すことができる最も意味のある目標を達成しました。

エドワードJ.ソザンスキー、フィラデルフィアインクワイアラー、3.18、1990
Edward J. Sozanski, Philadelphia Inquirer, 3.18, 1990

瞑想、創造、再生

Sozanski/1990/eng

「壁面記述」

「記憶の壁」

「8000年春、8000年秋」

「経墓」

CONTACT

  • Instagram

© 2017 by Hiroshi Kariya. all rights reserved.